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Geosciences Faculty Candidate in Radiogenic Isotope Geochemistry, Dr. Alan Rooney, a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Harvard University, will present on Wednesday, April 23rd at 4 PM in 022 Deike.

College of EMS Headlines - Mon, 04/21/2014 - 12:59

Geosciences Faculty Candidate in Radiogenic Isotope Geochemistry, Dr. Alan Rooney, a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Harvard University, will present "Weathering the Snowball: Insights and Implications from Re-OS Geochronology" on Wednesday, April 23rd at 4 PM in 022 Deike. A Coffee & Cookies Reception will precede the talk at 3:45 PM in the EMS Museum on the ground floor of Deike. All are welcome.

 

Dr. Rooney research interests lie in geochronology and the geochemical evolution of the Earth during pivotal times of change. This work integrates geological mapping, geochronology, and isotope geochemistry to better understand the driving mechanisms underlying many geological phenomena such as extreme climate perturbations, biogeochemical developments, and crustal processes such as hydrocarbon generation and migration. Dr. Rooney holds a Ph.D. in Geology and Geochemistry from Durham University, a Masters from Stockholm University, and a BSc from Glasgow University.

 

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Work of EMS faculty on IPCC climate change reports featured in CDT's "Focus on Research"

College of EMS Headlines - Mon, 04/21/2014 - 09:34

The climate is changing, people are playing a major role in the changes, and individuals and communities in all parts of the world are experiencing the effects.

Those are some of the key conclusions in the latest reports from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The Penn State faculty who were contributors to these comprehensive scientific assessments said they expect that the findings — based on more finely tuned climate models and an expanded look at the effects of climate change — will resonate with the public. View online <http://www.centredaily.com/2014/04/19/4141697/penn-state-faculty-acting-as-scientific.html>

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Geosciences final Colloquium Speaker for the semester is Dr. Ted Daeschler, Associate Professor, Department of Biodiversity, Earth and Environmental Science at Drexel University. His talk is on Tuesday, April 22nd, at 4 PM in 022 Deike.

College of EMS Headlines - Wed, 04/16/2014 - 15:54

Geosciences final Colloquium Speaker for the semester is Dr. Ted Daeschler, Associate Professor, Department of Biodiversity, Earth and Environmental Science at Drexel University. His talk on Tuesday, April 22nd, at 4 PM in 022 Deike is entitled "Great Steps in the History of Life: The Origin of Limbed Vertebrates." A pre-talk Speaker Reception will be held at 3:45 PM in the EMS Museum. All are welcome.

 

Dr. Daeschler received his Ph.D in Geology from the University of Pennsylvania and, in addition to his academic position, is also the Associate Curator of Vertebrate Zoology at Drexel's Academy of Natural Sciences. In 2004, Dr. Daeschler, along with Neil Shubin of the University of Chicago, the late Farish Jenkins of Harvard University, and other colleagues, discovered an example of the evolutionary transition between finned and limbed animals: Tiktaalik roseae, a 375 million year-old fossil lobe-finned fish with many features only seen in tetrapods (limbed animals). Their discovery has attracted attention from the paleontology community, documentary filmmakers, textbook publishers, teachers, and even medical professionals who believe Tiktaalik reveals important information about the history of life, including human. PBS airs a documentary in this month on the discovery. Dr. Daeschler was also a recent guest on the Colbert Show.

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Geosciences Faculty Candidate in Radiogenic Isotope Geochemistry, Dr. Andrew Smye of the University of Texas at Austin, will present "The Pulse of the Earth: Timescales of Heating During Assembly and Breaking of the Continents" on Monday, April 14th.

College of EMS Headlines - Fri, 04/11/2014 - 11:31

Geosciences Faculty Candidate in Radiogenic Isotope Geochemistry, Dr. Andrew Smye of the University of Texas at Austin, will present "The Pulse of the Earth: Timescales of Heating During Assembly and Breaking of the Continents" on Monday, April 14th, at 4 PM in 022 Deike. A Coffee & Cookies Reception will precede the talk at 3:45 PM in the EMS Museum on the ground floor of Deike. All are welcome.

 

Dr. Smye, who is the Jackson Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Texas, received his Ph.D. in Geology from the University of Cambridge (U.K.) and his MSci in Earth Science from the University of Oxford (U.K.). Dr. Smye considers himself an Earth Scientist who seeks to understand the processes that drive crustal evolution and its interaction with the hydrosphere and atmosphere. Central to this aim is the integration of data-sets collected over a wide range of length-scales, from kilometers in the field to nanometers in the laboratory.

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The Geosciences Department continues its Colloquium Speaker Series with Dr. Linda Elkins-Tanton, Director of the Carnegie Institution for Science's Department of Terrestrial Magnetism. on Tuesday, April 15th, at 4 PM in 022 Deike.

College of EMS Headlines - Thu, 04/10/2014 - 11:50

The Geosciences Department continues its Colloquium Speaker Series with Dr. Linda Elkins-Tanton, Director of the Carnegie Institution for Science's Department of Terrestrial Magnetism. She will present "Volcanoes and the Great Dying: The End-Permian Extinction" on Tuesday, April 15th, at 4 PM in 022 Deike. A Speaker's Coffee & Cookies Reception will precede the talk at 3:45 PM in the EMS Museum. All are welcome.

 

Dr. Elkins-Tanton received her B.S. and M.S. from MIT. Prior to her current position at Carnegie, she worked in the high-tech venture industry, as a researcher at Brown University, and as a faculty member at MIT. The focus of her research is on the evolution of terrestrial planets and the relationships between Earth and life on Earth, including the connection between volcanic provinces and global extinction events. Dr. Elkins-Tanton has been recognized with numerous awards from the National Academy of Sciences, Oxford University, MIT and the Explorers Club. She has also be involved in spacecraft missions such as the SAGE Venus Lander and the International Lunar Network. Her six-book reference series, The Solar System, was published in 2010.

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Monitoring the weather

College of EMS Headlines - Wed, 04/09/2014 - 13:00

Meteorologists Fred Gadomski and Chuck Pavloski and graduate student Burkely Twiest are featured in the IT News story "Monitoring the Weather." <<Read the story>>

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Geosciences Faculty Candidate in Radiogenic Isotope Geochemistry, Dr. Emily Chin of Brown University, will present "The Origin and Evolution of the Deep Continental Arc Lithosphere: Constraints Using Xenoliths from California's Sierra Nevada" on Wed 4/9.

College of EMS Headlines - Tue, 04/08/2014 - 14:35

Geosciences Faculty Candidate in Radiogenic Isotope Geochemistry, Dr. Emily Chin of Brown University, will present "The Origin and Evolution of the Deep Continental Arc Lithosphere: Constraints Using Xenoliths from California's Sierra Nevada" on Wednesday, April 9th, at 4 PM in 022 Deike. A Coffee & Cookies Reception will precede the talk at 3:45 PM in the EMS Museum on the ground floor of Deike.

 

Dr. Chin is currently a Postdoctoral Research Associate with the Department of Geological Sciences at Brown University. She received her Ph.D in Earth Sciences from Rice University and BS in Geology from Tulane University. 

Dr. Chin's expertise is in igneous and metamorphic petrology, but she considers herself a geologist in the broadest sense. She is interested primarily in the formation, evolution, and dynamics of the deep lithosphere beneath volcanic arcs, with a current focus on Western North America. She employs a wide spectrum of analytical approaches ranging from in situ techniques such as electron microprobe microanalysis and laser ablation ICP-MS, to bulk techniques to determine elemental and isotopic compositions of rocks and minerals.

 

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Geosciences Colloquium Speaker, Dr. Ann Pearson, Professor, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University, will present "Molecular and Isotopic Signatures from Early Mid-Life" on Tuesday, April 8th, at 4 PM in 022 Deike.

College of EMS Headlines - Fri, 04/04/2014 - 13:52

Geosciences Colloquium Speaker, Dr. Ann Pearson, Professor, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Harvard University, will present "Molecular and Isotopic Signatures from Early Mid-Life" on Tuesday, April 8th, at 4 PM in 022 Deike. A Speaker's Coffee & Cookies Reception will precede the talk at 3:45 PM in the EMS Museum on the ground floor. All are welcome.

 

Currently the Murray and Martha Ross Professor of Environmental Sciences at Harvard, Dr. Pearson received her Ph.D in Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry from the MIT/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Joint Program.

Dr. Pearson specializes in micro and nanoscale analytical applications of light isotope geochemistry. Her research interests include the coevolution of microbes and their biochemical pathways, specifically in the context of historical changes in Earth’s surface environments. Through study of the “how, when, and why” of microbial processes, her work yields insight about environmental conditions on Earth today, in the past, and about potential human impacts on our future. Her recent award and recognition include Kavli Fellow at the National Academy of Sciences, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation Investigator, Radcliffe Institute Fellow, and the David and Lucille Packard Foundation Fellowship for Science and Engineering.

 

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