Skip Logos, Search and Top Navigation
Skip to Top Navigation

Dr. Emma Bullock, Geochemist, Mineralogy and Petrology of Meteorites, The Smithsonian Institution, speaks at the Geosciences Colloquium on Tuesday, November 11th, at 4 PM in 022 Deike. All are welcome.

College of EMS Headlines - Wed, 10/29/2014 - 11:29

Dr. Bullock's talk is entitled "The Solar System's First Dust Bunnies." Prior to the November 11th talk, a Coffee & Cookies Speaker Reception will take place at 3:45 PM in the EMS Museum on the ground floor of Deike.

 

Dr. Bullock obtained her undergraduate degree in Geochemistry from the University of Manchester, followed by a Ph.D. at the Open University (England). Before joining the Smithsonian, she worked at the Natural History Museum, London, where she studied aqueous alteration in primitive meteorites. Her research is focused on refractory inclusions and early solar system chronology.

Categories: , College of EMS e-News

Dr. Peter Kelemen, the Arthur D. Storke Professor of Geochemistry at Columbia University's Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory, speaks at the Geosciences Colloquium on Tuesday, November 4th, at 4 PM in 022 Deike. All are welcome.

College of EMS Headlines - Wed, 10/29/2014 - 10:37

Dr. Kelemen's talk is entitled "Emulating Natural Systems for Geologic CO2 Capture and Storage and to Enhance Subsurface Permeability." Prior to the November 4th talk, a Coffee & Cookies Speaker Reception will take place at 3:45 PM in the EMS Museum on the ground floor of Deike.

   

Dr. Kelemen received his Ph.D. in Geology from the University of Washington. His current research is focused on reactive transport of lava through the Earth’s upper mantle and lower crust, genesis and evolution of oceanic and continental crust, new mechanisms for earthquake initiation, geologic capture and storage of CO2 (CCS), and reaction-driven cracking in natural and engineered settings. He was a founding partner of Dihedral Exploration (1980-1992), consultants specializing in exploration for mineral deposits in Canada, Alaska and Greenland. Dr. Kelemen's worldwide research has taken him from7,500 meters above sea level in Pakistan to 5,500 meters below sea level via submersibles along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. He was recently elected to the National Academy of Sciences, one of the highest honors accorded to a scientist or engineer in the United States.

Categories: , College of EMS e-News

Weather weenies rejoice: Arboretum device offers more data

While the Penn State Arboretum will always be a place for plant lovers, it may find a new following among weather wonks. That’s because the University’s inviting garden with oaks, flowers and ornamental grasses is now also home to a high-tech weather system.
Categories: College of EMS e-News

Dr. Pincelli Hull, Assistant Professor, the Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, speaks at the Geosciences Colloquium on Tuesday, October 28th, at 4 PM in 022 Deike.

College of EMS Headlines - Fri, 10/24/2014 - 10:43

Geosciences Colloquium Speaker, Dr. Pincelli Hull, Assistant Professor of Paleontology, Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, presents "Resolving Communities Through Time: The Promise and Challenge of Measuring Biotic Sensitivity in Cenozoic Oceans" on Tuesday, October 28th, at 4 PM in 022 Deike. A pre-talk speaker reception will take place at 3:45 PM in the EMS Museum on the ground floor of Deike. All are welcome.

 

Dr. Hull received her Ph.D. from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California at San Diego and a B.S. in Biology from Duke University with post doctoral research in Germany and at Yale University. She also spent a college semester at sea with the Sea Education Association, studying oceanography, nautical science and maritime history. Dr. Hull is broadly interested in the evolution and ecology of open ocean ecosystems and species over long-time scales as these are the scales on which species evolve and go extinct and ecosystems collapse and reassemble. The Hull Lab focuses on understanding open ocean ecosystems through the Cenozoic (the last 65 million years), disentangling the causes and consequences of mass extinctions and quantifying community response to global change. Her goal is to understand how species, communities, and ecosystems are shaped by large infrequent events like mass extinctions and climate change and how such events affect the history of life. Ultimately, the group hopes to gain some insight into how Earth’s biota will respond to the profound, widespread human-caused environmental and climatic changes of today.

 

Categories: , College of EMS e-News

Lisa Jackson, Apple VP and former EPA chief, to speak at Penn State on Nov. 6

Lisa Jackson, vice president of environmental initiatives at Apple Inc. and former administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, will be the keynote speaker at the 2014 Colloquium on the Environment on Nov. 6.
Categories: College of EMS e-News

Joint Center for Energy Research promotes U.S.-China collaboration

With the goal of promoting global cooperation in clean energy research and education, Penn State and Dalian University of Technology (DUT) in China established an international Joint Center for Energy Research (JCER) in 2011 as a part of global engagement efforts at both universities.
Categories: College of EMS e-News

Penn State to join international celebration of geographic information systems

GIS Day, the annual, worldwide salute to geospatial technology and its power to transform and better lives, is coming to Penn State on Wednesday, Nov. 19, during Geography Awareness Week, Nov. 16 to 22.
Categories: College of EMS e-News

On Tuesday, October 21st, Geosciences Colloquium Speaker, Dr. Sarah Brownlee, Assistant Professor, Department of Geology, Wayne State University, presents "Seismic Anisotropy as a Tool for Improving Understanding of Composition and Structure in the Contin

College of EMS Headlines - Thu, 10/16/2014 - 11:56

On Tuesday, October 21st, Geosciences Colloquium Speaker, Dr. Sarah Brownlee, Assistant Professor, Department of Geology, Wayne State University, presents "Seismic Anisotropy as a Tool for Improving Understanding of Composition and Structure in the Continental Crust" at 4 PM in 022 Deike Building. A pre-talk speaker reception will take place at 3:45 PM in the EMS Museum on the ground floor of Deike. All are welcome.

  

Dr. Brownlee received a B.A. in Geosciences from Princeton University and a Ph.D. in Earth and Planetary Sciences from the University of California at Berkley. Her fields of specialty are geochemistry and geophysics. Dr. Brownlee's research interests include the study of the structure, composition, and elasticity of middle and lower crustal materials. She is currently working to understand seismic anisotropy in the lower continental crust along with time and length scales of processes governing transport of material through the crust. She uses a combination of thermochronology, paleomagnetism, analytical techniques, and numerical modeling in her research.

 

Categories: , College of EMS e-News

Marcellus Shale Tour and Panel Discussion to be held Oct. 29 at the Palmer

The Palmer Museum of Art will present the Marcellus Shale Tour and Panel Discussion titled "Boom/Bust Cycles of Extractive Industries in Pennsylvania" at the museum from 4:30 to 6 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 29.
Categories: College of EMS e-News

Mineralogical society event will celebrate iconic dinosaur artist Knight

“Charles R. Knight: Art and Geology” celebrates the work of Charles R. Knight, the "father of paleoart," whose paintings of dinosaurs and other prehistoric creatures have been seen by millions in museums, zoos, libraries, books and films. The free event kicks off at 7 p.m. on Oct. 15 in 114 Earth and Engineering Science Building with a special tribute and talk at 7:45 p.m.
Categories: College of EMS e-News

Penn State Brandywine professor joins NOAA crew for research mission at sea

Since joining Penn State Brandywine’s faculty in 2001, Associate Professor of Earth Science Laura Guertin has focused on bringing real-world perspective into the classroom. The geologist recently voyaged to sections of the Atlantic Ocean to conduct a research mission with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) as part of its Teacher at Sea Program.
Categories: College of EMS e-News

Geoscience Colloquium Speaker, Dr. Christopher Kincaid, Professor of Oceanography with the Graduate School of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island, will present "Subduction Sonnet 116: Let Me Not to the Marriage of Plume and Slab, Admit Impedime

College of EMS Headlines - Thu, 10/09/2014 - 10:47

Geoscience Colloquium Speaker, Dr. Christopher Kincaid, Professor of Oceanography with the Graduate School of Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island, will present "Subduction Sonnet 116: Let Me Not to the Marriage of Plume and Slab, Admit Impediments" at 4 PM on the 14th in 022 Deike. A pre-talk Speaker Reception will be held at 3:45 PM in the EMS Museum. All are welcome.

 

Dr. Kincaid holds Ph.D. in Geophysical Fluid Dynamics from The John Hopkins University. His research interests are divided between the dynamics of Earth's interior and problems in coastal physical oceanography. Dr. Kincaid uses 3D laboratory and numerical models to study circulation and thermal-chemical transport within Earth's mantle. Recent projects focus on the interaction between buoyant mantle plumes and plate subduction processes. These include developing coupled ecosystem models for Narragansett Bay, exploring the relationship between poor flushing within urban estuaries and chronic water quality problems, and studying the June 13, 2013, meteotsunami that hit Rhode Island. 

Categories: , College of EMS e-News

Science researchers hone their communication skills at workshop

On Oct. 2, a group of Penn State faculty gathered with policymakers and journalists in a workshop on science communication skills. The training was co-sponsored by the Earth and Environmental Systems Institute (EESI) and the Penn State Institutes of Energy and the Environment (PSIEE). This is the second science communication workshop the groups have organized and is part of an ongoing strategic initiative to improve researchers’ skills in this area.
Categories: College of EMS e-News

Emeritus Professor awarded Fulbright Distinguished Chair Award in India

Raja V. Ramani, Emeritus Professor of Mining and GeoEnvironmental Engineering, and Emeritus George H. Jr. and Anne B. Deike Chair in Mining Engineering, was awarded the Fulbright - Nehru Distinguished Chair at the Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur (IIT-KGP) for October 2014 to February 2015.
Categories: College of EMS e-News

Marcellus Shale Gallery Conversations begin Oct. 10 at the Palmer Museum of Art

The Palmer Museum of Art will present a series of gallery conversations this fall related to the major exhibition organized by the Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, "Marcellus Shale Documentary Project," now on view at the museum through Dec. 14.
Categories: College of EMS e-News

Air pollution and the ocean

Scientists have a good understanding of how air pollution impacts human health and the terrestrial biosphere, but what impact does air pollution have on oceans? To help answer this question, this past August, researchers from Penn State's Department of Meteorology embarked on a three-week, NSF-funded field project to catch and analyze rainwater at sea.
Categories: College of EMS e-News

Couple's inaugural gift for Steidle laboratory honors 1942 alumnus

Joel Reed and his wife, Kim Boeshore Reed, recently made a philanthropic commitment to name a new laboratory the Paul Herman Reed Thermal Characterization Laboratory inside the Steidle Building.
Categories: College of EMS e-News

Geosciences Colloquium Speaker, Dr. Douglas Kennett, Professor of Environmental Archaeology and Human Behavioral Ecology, Department of Anthropology, Penn State University, presents "Interdisciplinary Opportunities for the Study of Human-Earth Interaction

College of EMS Headlines - Thu, 10/02/2014 - 13:02

Geosciences Colloquium Speaker, Dr. Douglas Kennett, Professor of Environmental Archaeology and Human Behavioral Ecology, Department of Anthropology, Penn State University, presents "Interdisciplinary Opportunities for the Study of Human-Earth Interactions with AMS Radiocarbon" at 4 PM on Tuesday, October 7th, in 022 Deike. A pre-talk Speaker Reception will be held at 3:45 PM in the EMS Museum. All are welcome.

 

Dr. Kennett received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Santa Barbara, in Anthropology with a specialization in Archaeology. His current research interests include the study of human sociopolitical dynamics under changing environmental conditions, human impacts on ancient environments, and behavioral response to abrupt climate change in the past. In addition to his tenure at Penn State, he has held faculty positions at California State University Long Beach and the University of Oregon. He is the author of The Island Chumash (University of California Press, 2005) and co-editor, with Bruce Winterhalder, of the book Behavioral Ecology and the Transition to Agriculture (University of California Press, 2006). He is also the co-editor, with Atholl Anderson, of Taking the High Ground: the Archaeology of Rapa, a fortified island in remote East Polynesia (Australia National University Press, 2012).

 

Categories: , College of EMS e-News

NSF funds three Penn State teams to study 2D materials

Through the National Science Foundation's Emerging Frontiers in Research and Innovation (EFRI) program, Penn State was awarded $4 million over the next four years to lead two teams of investigators and support members of a third team in the new field of 2D crystals and layered materials.
Categories: College of EMS e-News

Interdisciplinary team aims to predict the future of Antarctic ice

The National Science Foundation's Division of Mathematical Sciences has awarded more than $500,000 to Penn State to develop new statistical methods needed for predicting the future of Antarctic ice sheets. Using information gleaned from geologic data from the past 20,000 years, the scientists also will apply their new methods to provide a better understanding of the past and current behavior of the ice sheets.
Categories: College of EMS e-News

DEPARTMENTS

INSTITUTES

AFFILIATES